Friday, October 3, 2014

nprhereandnow:

Episode 4: A New Generation In The Navajo Nation Government

The Navajo Nation is the biggest Indian reservation in the U.S., occupying parts of three different states – Arizona, Utah and New Mexico. In the capital, Window Rock, Ariz., the one-story stone buildings of the Navajo government are grouped together near the huge rock formation that gave Window Rock its name.

Chad Singer, 24, started out as an intern in the Office of the President and Vice President, and is now a constituent representative there. He got his degree in political science from Arizona State University in May 2013 and wants to be president of the Navajo Nation one day.

“I want to go out and help people find jobs, help people find homes – especially the veterans. There’s a lot of environmental issues happening on our reservation and I do want to take care of those things – and the elders and instilling the language in our youth.”

Singer laments that it’s difficult for educated people his age to find good jobs and work in politics in the Navajo Nation. 

“When we finish high school, they say go to college, get your degree and then come back to help your people. But when we obtain our degrees and come back, they say we’re not qualified. … The ones that have degrees, they end up branching off and going into the border towns such as Albuquerque, Flagstaff, Phoneix and Denver. So they go out throughout the nation and it’s quite sad because a lot of the older generations who do work here don’t have a degree.”

The people of Navajo Nation not only have the midterm elections next month, they’ll also be electing the executive and legislative branches of their tribal government – something that happens every four years. There’s a controversy over one of the presidential candidates, Chris Deschene, because he does not speak Navajo fluently. Some say that’s against Navajo law and think Deschene should be disqualified from the race.

“It is important that the president does know Navajo,” Singer says. “But we also have to take into consideration that the younger generations aren’t as fluent as the generations before us, and you know that’s something that we have to look at. And it’s not our fault we weren’t brought up on such – of being in the mainstream society.”

Talking with other ambitious and accomplished young people who are taking on leadership roles in the Navajo Nation, I heard about frustration with the tribal government and the rejection of young educated job applicants. Everyone I spoke with shares a fervent dedication to preserving their culture and helping their people.

-Rachel

Seabiscuit made his debut there, the Beatles played there, and Bing Crosby had a stable at the track. Reporter Bruce Gellerman looks back over the colorful history of Suffolk Downs.

Seabiscuit made his debut there, the Beatles played there, and Bing Crosby had a stable at the track. Reporter Bruce Gellerman looks back over the colorful history of Suffolk Downs.

Thursday, September 25, 2014
“Poll Vault” analyst Steve Koczela looks at the data on ballot questions, and the percentage of voters who answer the questions. Here’s what he discovered.

“Poll Vault” analyst Steve Koczela looks at the data on ballot questions, and the percentage of voters who answer the questions. Here’s what he discovered.

Friday, September 19, 2014

nprhereandnow:

Jordan Bridges, 26, is a coal miner in Logan County, in the heart of West Virginia’s southern coal mines and the mountainous green landscape of Appalachia. He talks about his life and the issues that are important to him, alongside his 21-year-old wife Erica and their two-year-old daughter Gracie.

West Virginia is the second-largest coal producer in the U.S., after Wyoming; 95 percent of the electricity generated in West Virginia last year came from coal-fired electric power plants. While driving to Logan County, we saw billowing smoke stacks and cooling towers, license plates that boasted “Friends of Coal” and a roadside political banner urging voters to elect a “miner for miners.”

-Rachel

A Chinese vase from a New England collection has sold at a Boston auction house for $24.7 million, setting a U.S. record.
The elaborate 18th century vase stands nearly three feet tall and is made of painted enamel and bronze.  » Full story and photo.

A Chinese vase from a New England collection has sold at a Boston auction house for $24.7 million, setting a U.S. record.

The elaborate 18th century vase stands nearly three feet tall and is made of painted enamel and bronze.  » Full story and photo.

Friday, September 12, 2014

The Alternate Routes Road Trip

nprhereandnow:

Hi all, exciting news. For the next month, I — Rachel Rohr, Here & Now’s digital and social media producer — will be taking over H&N’s Tumblr for a special, month-long reporting trip:

Alternate Routes
A cross-country road trip ahead of the midterm elections,
in search of the stories of young Americans and the issues that
matter most in their lives. Presented by WBUR and NPR’s Here & Now.

You’ll also be able to follow the trip on Here & Now’s Instagram and my Twitter, @liontalk, while I drive across America in a 1991 VW Vanagon camper van. Here’s what she looks like:

image

And here’s the route I’ll be taking (with plenty of flexibility for the unexpected):

image

Along the way, I’ll be talking with young people in cities and towns, and hearing their stories about why they live where they live and do what they do. What’s it like to be a second-generation coal miner in West Virginia? What’s the path for a Mormon college student in Utah? What’s drawing twenty-somethings to Cleveland? At the heart of it is the decision facing every young person — stay or go?

If you have ideas or suggestions — for people or places I shouldn’t miss along the route — send me a tweet or message me on Tumblr. I’d love to hear from you. And if you find yourself missing the stories that are usually on this Tumblr, check out Here & Now’s website, hereandnow.org.

Alternate Routes will be a podcast, too, sharing the stories of young people I meet in my travels. We’ll have a link to subscribe on iTunes soon, too.

Thanks for reading and I hope you’ll follow the journey!

-Rachel

Thursday, September 11, 2014
Suzanne C. Dubus is the chief executive of a domestic violence prevention center. Read her full commentary here: Staying With An Abuser: It’s More Complicated Than ‘Stand By Your Man’
» Follow @wbur

Suzanne C. Dubus is the chief executive of a domestic violence prevention center. Read her full commentary here: Staying With An Abuser: It’s More Complicated Than ‘Stand By Your Man’

» Follow @wbur

Wednesday, September 10, 2014
nprhereandnow:

Poet Daniel Johnson remembers his longtime friend, the journalist James Foley who was killed by militants in Syria last month, in the poem “In the Absence of Sparrows.”
"On some level, my hope was that if I could put the right words down, and combine them in the right way, he would return," Johnson told Here & Now’s Robin Young.
Hear the rest of the interview and read the poem in its entirety here.

nprhereandnow:

Poet Daniel Johnson remembers his longtime friend, the journalist James Foley who was killed by militants in Syria last month, in the poem “In the Absence of Sparrows.”

"On some level, my hope was that if I could put the right words down, and combine them in the right way, he would return," Johnson told Here & Now’s Robin Young.

Hear the rest of the interview and read the poem in its entirety here.

How did your town vote in the primaries?
Catch up on the details with our Massachusetts town-by-town map of primary day results in five key races.

How did your town vote in the primaries?

Catch up on the details with our Massachusetts town-by-town map of primary day results in five key races.

Tuesday, September 9, 2014
Republican gubernatorial candidate Charlie Baker meets with voters in Malden. (Asma Khalid/WBUR)
» For primary day data and updates, see our live blog.

Republican gubernatorial candidate Charlie Baker meets with voters in Malden. (Asma Khalid/WBUR)

» For primary day data and updates, see our live blog.